a

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, conse ctetur adip elit, pellentesque turpis.

Image Alt

Lesson Tutor: Learning American Sign Language (ASL) For Descriptive Words

  /  Lesson Tutor: Learning American Sign Language (ASL) For Descriptive Words

American Sign Language (ASL) and Signed English (SE)
Series 2 Lesson 12: Opposite and Descriptive Words
By Elaine Ernst Schneider

 

more
less
few
 more
  less
 few

 

 

in front
behind
ruined
 in front
 behind
 ruined

 

 

new
old
long
new
 old
 long

 

 

short
tall
thin
 short
 tall
thin

 

last
first
again
 last
 first
again

 

pretty
 
ugly

Series 2 Lesson 12: Opposite and Descriptive Words

Signs Description of Sign Actions
again Slightly bend the right “b” hand as you bring it tips first to rest in the extended left palm. The motion should look like you are “putting” something into the left hand. If you wish to indicate that you have done something several times, tap fingers on left palm more than once.
behind Place the right “A” hand in front of the left “A” hand, with the knuckles of the left hand touching the right wrist. Then move the right hand to a position behind the left hand, right knuckles touching the left wrist.
few Hold a right “a” hand, palm up. Then allow the fingers to open, one by one, rotating the wrist to the right. Note: The sign is similar to the motion that is used when sowing a “few” seeds for planting.
first Hold left hand in “thumbs up” position. Then touch the left thumb with the index finger of a right “d” hand.
in front Use the right hand, open palm fingers together, to indicate an imaginary wall or mirror directly in front of the face. Palm of the right hand should be turned inward toward the face. Make the movement from top to bottom.
last Use the index finger of a right “D” hand to gently strike the pinky finger of a left “I” hand.
less Move cupped hands (fingers held together) from a position of about six inches between them to a proximity of only an inch or two between palms.
long Hold the left arm straight out from the body. Then move the right index finger along the left arm, starting at the wrist and ending at the shoulder.
more Hold both hands in a loose cup with fingertips close and pointing at each other. Some signers actually touch the fingertips of both hands together.
new Hold both hands palm upward in front of body. Use right hand to graze the palm of the left hand, touching the back of the right hand lightly in a right to left arcing motion. Allow the right hand to continue upward, stopping at upper chest level.
old Pantomime grasping an imaginary beard with the right “s” hand and pull it downward
pretty Using the right hand, touch the forehead with all four fingers. Then move the hand in a counterclockwise motion around the left side of the face, ending  at the chin. Note: Some signers begin and end at the chin, making a full circle around the face.
ruined Make a left “s” hand with the palm turned downward. Then make a right “x” hand. Place the right “x” hand on the back of the left “s” hand about at the wrist. Then move the right hand across the back of the left hand from the wrist, out across the knuckles.
short Move the middle finger of a right “H” hand backward and then forward on the index finger of a left “H” hand.
tall Place a right “D” hand on the left flat palm of the left hand (which is facing outward). Move right hand upward, brushing the left palm.
thin Touch the pinky finger of a right “I” hand (held upside down) to the index finger of a left “D” hand. Then move both fingers in opposition, as if drawing a thin line.
ugly Place the index finger of a right “D” hand just under the nose; then move it to the right of the face, curling the index finger until it makes a right “X” sign.
Continue to Printable wordsearch worksheet to review Series 2

Submitted by:  Elaine Ernst Schneider entered the classroom as a special education teacher in the 1970’s. Since then, she has taught mainstream English Grammar, Literature, music K-12, deaf education, psychology, Algebra, creative writing, social studies, law, and science in both public and private schools. Presently, Elaine is a curriculum author for multiple educational publishers and is the managing editor of Lesson Tutor, a lesson plan website found at http://www.lessontutor.com. Her most recent books, 52 Children’s Moments (Synergy Publications) and Taking Hearing Impairment to School (JayJo Books and the Guidance Channel) can be found at Amazon.com. She is currently working on a project with Pearson Prentice Hall as an author of an on-line teacher’s professional development course for the Council for Exceptional Children.

More Articles by this author, Click Here
More lessons in American Sign Language,  Click Here